Going wide in Galicia

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Wide-angle lens photography in Galicia

Fujifilm X-T1, Fujinon 14mm f2.8 lens, 1/125 @  f9, ISO 400

There’s a seaside town in north-west Galicia called Muxia. The town has a church (Virxe da Barca) built on a rocky outpost facing the sea. On the rocks below it is a stone (Pedra d’Abalar) which people crawl under for luck. Muxia is on the final leg of the Camino de Santiago from the city of Santiago to Finisterre (or Fisterra in Galician, the local dialect). Pilgrims and tourists pass through, visiting the church, taking selfies, crawling under the lucky rock –and getting in the way of photographers like me who would just like to take a photo without anybody in it.

The solution was to move in as close to the lucky rock with a 14mm lens (APS-C) as I could. This let me frame the rock and the church in a way that included the dramatic sky and excluded every one of the 30 or so people wandering around.

I converted the image to black and white in Lightroom to emphasise the hard, dramatic light (photo taken mid-afternoon) and the texture of the rock and church.

Here is another wide-angle photo showing the lucky rock in its entirety, and some of the other people visiting the scene.

Wide-angle lens photography in Galicia

These photos illustrate one of the fun elements of wide-angle lenses – the dramatic changes in viewpoint and perspective that moving around creates. You don’t get this with longer focal lengths.

 

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